Reviews

Strange The Dreamer – Laini Taylor

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The dream chooses the dreamer, not the other way around—and Lazlo Strange, war orphan and junior librarian, has always feared that his dream chose poorly. Since he was five years old he’s been obsessed with the mythic lost city of Weep, but it would take someone bolder than he to cross half the world in search of it. Then a stunning opportunity presents itself, in the person of a hero called the Godslayer and a band of legendary warriors, and he has to seize his chance or lose his dream forever.

What happened in Weep two hundred years ago to cut it off from the rest of the world? What exactly did the Godslayer slay that went by the name of god? And what is the mysterious problem he now seeks help in solving?

The answers await in Weep, but so do more mysteries—including the blue-skinned goddess who appears in Lazlo’s dreams. How did he dream her before he knew she existed? And if all the gods are dead, why does she seem so real?

Welcome to Weep.

Goodreads

My Rating: 4.5 Stars

In the fall of last year, I was fortunate enough to meet Laini Taylor. Although I hadn’t yet read any of her books, her Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy had been sitting on my shelf for some time. While I met many authors that day, she really stood out to me – not only because she has bright pink hair, but because she was just such a joy to to talk to during my brief introduction. Now, having finally read one of her books, I am dying to meet her all over again so that I can gush like a total fangirl over Strange the Dreamer.

Let me just start my review by saying this: Lazlo Strange epitomizes everything I look for in a narrator. From the beginning, he was just such a genuine, compassionate, and humble character. Somehow, Taylor made it feel as though I were reading a story told by my best friend. Amazingly, over the course of the book, he only got better – he treated those who looked down on him with kindness and understanding, remained humble, and was adorably innocent. Although I loved the book for many reasons, Lazlo’s narration was really what kept me coming back for more.

While not every character can be as incredible as Lazlo, Taylor did manage to bring quite an eclectic cast to life. Sarai, the other primary narrator, spent the entire book conflicted. As a godspawn, she was hated by all of the residents of Weep, and spent her whole life hiding from them. While her companions in the citadel hated all humans, Sarai felt compassion towards them. The conflicting love and hate she felt for the residents of Weep made her a really relatable character.

Strange the Dreamer was written in such a unique way that I doubt I will ever find anything similar. The best way to describe it is this: Taylor’s narration changes perspective in an almost conversational manner. Where most authors indicate a change in narration with a chapter change, Laini Taylor seamlessly shifted from view point to view point. It was like being part of a conversation, and jumping from mind to mind as each person spoke. I’ve never read anything quite like it, and while it took some time to get used to, it really was well done.

Alright romance lovers, I haven’t forgotten about you. Strange the Dreamer contained not one, but three devastatingly beautiful love stories. The first, of course is between Sarai and Lazlo, who don’t even really interact until well into the 200’s of this book. Although the other two romances are more secondary, they are just as well written and heart-wrenching. At the risk of sharing spoilers, I won’t elaborate further.

As is the case with most first books in a fantasy series, Strange the Dreamer was a little slow to pick up. The first half of the book was spent learning the characters and Weep’s rich backstory. I did pick up and put down the book multiple times, and didn’t really get sucked in until around the 300 page mark. However, I absolutely think that those first 300 pages were worth the read (as is the whole book of course).

My Takeaway: Although it didn’t immediately suck me in, Strange the Dreamer is absolutely worth reading. With one of my favorite narrators of all time, and a rich new fantasy world to dive into, it is definitely one of my favorite YA books so far this year. 

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